The Flight Club Effect

The Flight Club Effect

The Flight Club Effect

So you camped out or finally got through to a .com and secured your pair of sneakers and you’re aim is to resell them for profit, now what? That’s always the pressing question that is sent in to us here at SSB as well as asked of me personally. Sneakerheads often times buy kicks so they can sell them make a little money and continue to support the hobby.

Here’s the issue in a nutshell, the sneaker industry has become very lucrative for many people, so much so that the casual sneaker enthusiasts sometimes get this vision that 1 pair can make them rich. You can tell the type because they have no idea what to charge for the kicks they want to sell and often times no one has ever heard of the seller. They just show up with a pair ask for a price that often times cause you to step back and think could this dude be serious?

I’ve asked people often times where they got their price from? Seriously no disrespect bro but didn’t you buy them for retail? Let’s be honest here the money gets real slim if you bought a pair at a aftermarket price to turn around and resell them with the expectation of making a good profit. The money is really with the guy that buys them at retail for say $200 and can resell them for say $250+. That’s a decent chunk of change on a sneaker flip, considering most resellers absolutely refuse to invest in themselves. I mean many straight lose their minds if you don’t gift them the PayPal payment, of course that’s another story I’ll write about later.

If you been around the sneaker culture for any amount of time you’ve heard the term “Flight Club” prices. Of course I have no problem with Flight Club or their prices but lets be real they are known for the high end in most cases. (News flash for those unaware you can find some good deals on Flight Club if you just look around.)  Problem is, the average sneakerhead looking to buy and sell kicks like to base their price point on Flight Club prices. So when I ask “Where did you come up with that price?” I often get this reply “Flight Club is selling them for that much why can’t I?” Interesting answer, however consignment shops have to up charge to keep the lights on, employees & rent paid, it’s called “overhead”. Many consignment shops will sell your shoes and split the cost with you, it’s a win/win for some people because they may not have the reputation or connections to sell the sneakers themselves so the name and visibility of the consignment shop helps. So when you see that pair in the consignment shop window or website you’re seeing what the seller asked for, plus around 20% on top of that for the overhead costs. If you don’t have that kind of overhead to worry about, why not drop your price point to something more digestible to your potential customer, at the end of the day you’ll move more kicks gain more customers and of course increase your bottom line. Setting the right price should be something you determine for yourself, you can’t always compare yourself to what others are doing or trying to do or lets face it pretending to do. Some of those high priced kicks are sitting on those sites and in those stores so long because no one wants to pay those prices. Move inventory because we all know over time midsoles crumble and shoes yellow, right?

Of course you could have read that and said “forget that I’m going for as much as I can get” and that’s fine. I’m not against the reseller at all, lets be real you’re on SneakerShoeBox.com a site designed with sellers and buyers in mind and we also just launched TheShoepermarket.com with sellers and buyers in mind. I just stop from time to time and take a look around the culture and take inventory so to speak on what I see. Buyers and sellers always seem to be going back and forth which is never going to change, but their is a place for both to meet up and feel as though they walked away winning.

JStar25

My earliest memory of sneakers had to be when I was around 5 years old in the early 80's, seeing B-Boys break dancing on cardboard boxes with fresh Adidas, Pumas and on occasion Filas. From there the introduction of the Air Jordan just captivated me and I've been into kicks ever since.

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *